OBIEE 11G Oracle Strategy And Scorecard Management

Taking a step back again for a moment, another key new feature in OBIEE 11gR1 is support for key performance signals (KPIs). Then I determine the dimensionality of the KPI, in this situation, which makes it analyzable by two levels in the store hierarchy, and two in enough time hierarchy. The values used for these dimensions can either be “pinned”, which means that they stay static for this KPI, or they could be dynamic, that allows the user to change them to alter their point of view.

In the example above, I’m using regular “attribute” columns from my semantic model, but I can use hierarchical columns as well also. The dimensionality is defined Once, you then set the thresholds. In this example, I’m setting good performance as being within 90% of my threshold, acceptable to be 70% and below that, the performance is unacceptable. Once you’ve established this and a few other options, you save the KPI to the net catalog then.

Then, you can either display the results of the KPI in a straightforward desk, or they can be added by one to a KPI Watchlist, which may be added like any other object to a user’s dashboard. This KPI Watchlist can then be sliced and diced, using the sizing controls near the top of the watch list, to permit an individual to drill into whatever level of data these are authorized to view.

  • What services can I pre-book while making a booking
  • Less anxiousness and stress
  • Credit Analyst
  • Tucked in shirts, always
  • When you concentrate on the patent
  • Growth of business so they get more power, position, and salary

The Scorecard part of OBIEE 11g builds with this foundation of KPIs to allow you to define complex, multi-part strategies using the metrics in your semantic coating. Using these goals which are structured into a hierarchy of their own, I could create, for example, a strategy tree diagram that presents me how each goal feeds into the other.

In this case, my overall objective of improving store performance consists of my financial, and non-financial (stakeholder) goals, each with their own group of KPIs. You can arrange how much impact each objective is wearing its parent objective, so that, for example, the non-financial KPIs carry less weight than the financial ones. In the example above, while store sales and store margins are good and appropriate respectively, this is outweighed by the poor staff satisfaction ratings, which overall donate to a poor overall store performance rating. That is typical of balanced scorecards, where both financial and non-financial KPIs contribute to the overall, balanced rating for the business.

You can also define cause and effect maps, showing the partnership between KPIs in a “fishbone”-type of diagram. There’s much more to Oracle Strategy and Scorecard, and we’ll have to wait until the GA release to go through the full details. But it’s certainly a fascinating addition to the Oracle BI product profile, and the launch of KPIs and other higher-level business metadata into the OBIEE repository is a pleasant move.